Program

Preliminary program 

  • Friday, 8th June 2018
    09:00 - 09:45
    Opening Ceremonies, Peter Halén FSPA, Mr Hannu Tolonen Ministry of education, culture and sports.
    09:45 - 10:30
    Keynote lecture: What Measures Can I Use to Guide My Decision-making?
    10:30 - 11:00
    Refreshment break
    11:00 - 11:45
    Rotator Cuff Related Shoulder Pain: The (very) strong case for non-surgical management
    Rotator Cuff Related Shoulder pain: The (very) strong case for non-surgical management. Abstract Rotator cuff related shoulder pain (RCRSP) is an over-arching term that encompasses a spectrum of shoulder conditions that include; subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and symptomatic partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. For those diagnosed with RCRSP one aim of treatment is to achieve symptom free shoulder movement and function. Findings from high quality peer-reviewed research investigations suggest that a graduated and well-constructed exercise approach confers at least equivalent benefit as that derived from surgery for; subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, rotator cuff tendinopathy, partial thickness rotator cuff (RC) tears and atraumatic full thickness rotator cuff tears. These findings are important for people experiencing rotator cuff related shoulder pain, clinicians, and health funding bodies, as considerable healthcare savings could be achieved if surgery was only considered for those not obtaining satisfactory benefit from non-surgical intervention. However, many people diagnosed with RCRSP may feel that surgery is the only option if clinicians use harmful words in their explanations to patients, such as: ‘your acromion must be removed as it is impinging on your tendon’, ‘your symptoms are coming from your tear’, ‘if we don’t repair your tear it will become irreparable’, etc. These explanations are clearly inappropriate as research has suggested that reduction in pain and improvement in function for those diagnosed with impingement, and partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears does not depend upon the ‘success’ of the surgical intervention. It is possible that perceived benefit may be due to a placebo effect and possibly the enforced relative rest and graduated rehabilitation imposed by the surgical intervention. In addition there appears to be a stronger relationship between psychosocial factors and outcome than many physical factors for both surgical and non-surgical interventions. Considerable deficits in our understanding of RCRSP persist. These include; (i) cause and source of symptoms, (ii) establishing a definitive diagnosis, (iii) establishing the epidemiology of symptomatic RCRSP, (iv) knowing which tissues or systems to target intervention, and (v) which interventions are most effective. This lecture will address a number of these areas of uncertainty and will focus on uncertainties related to assessment, posture, imaging, injections, and surgery. It will include a discussion of the importance of psychosocial factors and outcomes, how the shoulder functions, as well as outcomes reported in research that has compared surgical to non-surgical interventions, for the range of RCRSP conditions including; subacromial impingement, partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. References:  Lewis J. Rotator cuff related shoulder pain: Assessment, management and uncertainties. Manual Therapy. 2016;23:57-68.  Lewis J, Green A, Wright C (2005) Subacromial impingement syndrome: The role of posture and muscle imbalance. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 14(4): 385-392.  Ratcliffe E, Pickering S, McLean S, Lewis J (2014) Is there a relationship between subacromial impingement syndrome and scapular orientation? A systematic review. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 48(16):1251-56.  Lewis JS. Bloodletting for pneumonia, prolonged bed rest for low back pain, is subacromial decompression another clinical illusion? British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015;49(5):280-1.  Chester R, Jerosch-Herold C, Lewis J, Shepstone L. Psychological factors are associated with the outcome of physiotherapy for people with shoulder pain: a multicentre longitudinal cohort study. Br J Sports Med. 20 Rotator Cuff Related Shoulder pain: The (very) strong case for non-surgical management. Abstract Rotator cuff related shoulder pain (RCRSP) is an over-arching term that encompasses a spectrum of shoulder conditions that include; subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and symptomatic partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. For those diagnosed with RCRSP one aim of treatment is to achieve symptom free shoulder movement and function. Findings from high quality peer-reviewed research investigations suggest that a graduated and well-constructed exercise approach confers at least equivalent benefit as that derived from surgery for; subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, rotator cuff tendinopathy, partial thickness rotator cuff (RC) tears and atraumatic full thickness rotator cuff tears. These findings are important for people experiencing rotator cuff related shoulder pain, clinicians, and health funding bodies, as considerable healthcare savings could be achieved if surgery was only considered for those not obtaining satisfactory benefit from non-surgical intervention. However, many people diagnosed with RCRSP may feel that surgery is the only option if clinicians use harmful words in their explanations to patients, such as: ‘your acromion must be removed as it is impinging on your tendon’, ‘your symptoms are coming from your tear’, ‘if we don’t repair your tear it will become irreparable’, etc. These explanations are clearly inappropriate as research has suggested that reduction in pain and improvement in function for those diagnosed with impingement, and partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears does not depend upon the ‘success’ of the surgical intervention. It is possible that perceived benefit may be due to a placebo effect and possibly the enforced relative rest and graduated rehabilitation imposed by the surgical intervention. In addition there appears to be a stronger relationship between psychosocial factors and outcome than many physical factors for both surgical and non-surgical interventions. Considerable deficits in our understanding of RCRSP persist. These include; (i) cause and source of symptoms, (ii) establishing a definitive diagnosis, (iii) establishing the epidemiology of symptomatic RCRSP, (iv) knowing which tissues or systems to target intervention, and (v) which interventions are most effective. This lecture will address a number of these areas of uncertainty and will focus on uncertainties related to assessment, posture, imaging, injections, and surgery. It will include a discussion of the importance of psychosocial factors and outcomes, how the shoulder functions, as well as outcomes reported in research that has compared surgical to non-surgical interventions, for the range of RCRSP conditions including; subacromial impingement, partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. References:  Lewis J. Rotator cuff related shoulder pain: Assessment, management and uncertainties. Manual Therapy. 2016;23:57-68.  Lewis J, Green A, Wright C (2005) Subacromial impingement syndrome: The role of posture and muscle imbalance. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 14(4): 385-392.  Ratcliffe E, Pickering S, McLean S, Lewis J (2014) Is there a relationship between subacromial impingement syndrome and scapular orientation? A systematic review. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 48(16):1251-56.  Lewis JS. Bloodletting for pneumonia, prolonged bed rest for low back pain, is subacromial decompression another clinical illusion? British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015;49(5):280-1.  Chester R, Jerosch-Herold C, Lewis J, Shepstone L. Psychological factors are associated with the outcome of physiotherapy for people with shoulder pain: a multicentre longitudinal cohort study. Br J Sports Med. 2016.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bUf9VcYLmI
    11:45 - 12:30
    A Whole Person Approach to Shoulder Pain – Recognizing the Role of the Thorax, Distal Influences & Optimizing Treatment
    A Whole Person Approach to Shoulder Pain – Recognizing the Role of the Thorax, Distal Influences & Optimizing Treatment
    12.30 - 13.30
    Lunch
    13:30 - 14:15
    Shoulder injury prevention and execution challenges
    Shoulder injury prevention and execution challenges
    14:15 - 14:45
    The shoulder girdle rehabilitation: Kinetic energy or heat absorption?
    The shoulder girdle rehabilitation: Kinetic energy or heat absorption?
    14:45 - 15:30
    Preventing overuse shoulder injuries in elite handball
    Preventing overuse shoulder injuries in elite handball
    15:30 - 16:00
    Refreshment break
    16:00 - 17:15
    Practical demonstration. Both speakers will do his session twice.
    Practical demonstration. Both speakers will do his session twice.
    17:15 - 18:15
    Interactive scientific session; Audience can vote for the best abstract by Kahoot mobile phone app. Moderator Ben Waller PT PhD
    Interactive scientific session; Audience can vote for the best abstract by Kahoot mobile phone app. Moderator Ben Waller PT PhD
    18:15
    First raffle off Clinical Sports Medicine The 5th ed. Vesa Kuparinen FSPA
    First raffle off Clinical Sports Medicine The 5th ed.
    20.00
    Dinner; Celebrating Sports Physiotherapy
    Dinner; Celebrating Sports Physiotherapy
  • Saturday, 9th June 2018
    8:30 - 8:45
    Good morning, Mikko Virtala FSPA
    08:45 - 09:30
    Keynote lecture: Rotator Cuff Related Shoulder Pain: The (very) strong case for non-surgical management 2.
    Rotator Cuff Related Shoulder pain: The (very) strong case for non-surgical management. Abstract Rotator cuff related shoulder pain (RCRSP) is an over-arching term that encompasses a spectrum of shoulder conditions that include; subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and symptomatic partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. For those diagnosed with RCRSP one aim of treatment is to achieve symptom free shoulder movement and function. Findings from high quality peer-reviewed research investigations suggest that a graduated and well-constructed exercise approach confers at least equivalent benefit as that derived from surgery for; subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, rotator cuff tendinopathy, partial thickness rotator cuff (RC) tears and atraumatic full thickness rotator cuff tears. These findings are important for people experiencing rotator cuff related shoulder pain, clinicians, and health funding bodies, as considerable healthcare savings could be achieved if surgery was only considered for those not obtaining satisfactory benefit from non-surgical intervention. However, many people diagnosed with RCRSP may feel that surgery is the only option if clinicians use harmful words in their explanations to patients, such as: ‘your acromion must be removed as it is impinging on your tendon’, ‘your symptoms are coming from your tear’, ‘if we don’t repair your tear it will become irreparable’, etc. These explanations are clearly inappropriate as research has suggested that reduction in pain and improvement in function for those diagnosed with impingement, and partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears does not depend upon the ‘success’ of the surgical intervention. It is possible that perceived benefit may be due to a placebo effect and possibly the enforced relative rest and graduated rehabilitation imposed by the surgical intervention. In addition there appears to be a stronger relationship between psychosocial factors and outcome than many physical factors for both surgical and non-surgical interventions. Considerable deficits in our understanding of RCRSP persist. These include; (i) cause and source of symptoms, (ii) establishing a definitive diagnosis, (iii) establishing the epidemiology of symptomatic RCRSP, (iv) knowing which tissues or systems to target intervention, and (v) which interventions are most effective. This lecture will address a number of these areas of uncertainty and will focus on uncertainties related to assessment, posture, imaging, injections, and surgery. It will include a discussion of the importance of psychosocial factors and outcomes, how the shoulder functions, as well as outcomes reported in research that has compared surgical to non-surgical interventions, for the range of RCRSP conditions including; subacromial impingement, partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. References:  Lewis J. Rotator cuff related shoulder pain: Assessment, management and uncertainties. Manual Therapy. 2016;23:57-68.  Lewis J, Green A, Wright C (2005) Subacromial impingement syndrome: The role of posture and muscle imbalance. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 14(4): 385-392.  Ratcliffe E, Pickering S, McLean S, Lewis J (2014) Is there a relationship between subacromial impingement syndrome and scapular orientation? A systematic review. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 48(16):1251-56.  Lewis JS. Bloodletting for pneumonia, prolonged bed rest for low back pain, is subacromial decompression another clinical illusion? British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015;49(5):280-1.  Chester R, Jerosch-Herold C, Lewis J, Shepstone L. Psychological factors are associated with the outcome of physiotherapy for people with shoulder pain: a multicentre longitudinal cohort study. Br J Sports Med. 2016.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bUf9VcYLmI
    09:30 - 10:00
    Refreshment break
    10:00 - 10:30
    Shoulder dislocation in contact athletes
    Shoulder dislocation in contact athletes.
    10:30 - 11.00
    Anterior shoulder pain - operative or non-operative treatment
    Anterior shoulder pain - operative or non-operative treatment
    11.00 - 11.30
    Overhead athletes and rotator cuff tendinopathy. Clinical observations and critical analysis of clinical assessment.
    During this presentation I first describe rotator cuff tendinopathy in general including possible risk factors leading to tendinopathic changes. I will then explain the difference in clinical presentations of RC tendinopathy in the general population versus the overhead athlete and I will show what the differences are when it comes to morphologic changes and changes found on clinical imaging comparing the two groups. I will point out that scientific literature not always matches the patients’ needs. Studies done on treatment of RC tendinopathy are often exerted on a general population whereas studies on the overhead shoulder are often writing about the findings I baseball pitchers, not always matching all overhead sports shoulder problems. I will try to explain the differences found in literature concerning ROM measurements and strength tests and will then compare this to my clinical observations.
    11:30 - 12:30
    Lunch
    12:30 - 13.15
    Dynamic Tape for a shoulder injury – Optimizing the performance?
    Dynamic Tape for a shoulder injury – Optimizing the performance?
    13:15 - 14:15
    Shoulder injury / athletes training
    Shoulder injury / athletes training
    14:15 - 14:45
    Refreshment break
    14:45 - 16:15
    Practical demonstration x 2 Both speakers will do his session twice.
    Practical demonstration. Both speakers will do his session twice.
    16:15 - 16:45
    Second raffle off Clinical Sports Medicine The 5th ed. & Summary, Peter Halén
    Second raffle off Clinical Sports Medicine The 5th ed. & Summary, Peter Halén
    Closing ceremonies, Seppo Pehkonen FSPA
    Closing ceremonies, Seppo Pehkonen